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Rhythm

This page is a work in progress. Check back soon for more!

How to practice rhythms on this page

Listen to the audio BEFORE clicking on “what this looks like”.

Echo on neutral syllable, then echo using rhythm language.

Choose one of the patterns and:

  1. chant it
  2. play it on the piano on a single key (use good form!)
  3. explore a scale using the rhythm pattern

BONUS: Using the different rhythmic units, make up your own two- or four-macrobeat pattern and:

  1. chant it
  2. play it on the piano on a single key (use good form!)
  3. explore a scale using the rhythm pattern
Photo by Stephen Niemeier on Pexels.com

DUPLE RHYTHMS

Click here to practice duple rhythms

When you hear the tick, move your full body (or upper body if you are seated) to the macrobeat, and tap your hands in your lap to the microbeat. Keep this movement going while you echo the patterns.

Series One
Basic macro/micro beats, at 70 bpm
Series Two
Subdivisions of the microbeat (i.e., 16ths in 4/4), at 60bpm
Series Three
Off beats (syncopations)

For this series, you will hear the patterns twice. Instead of echoing, listen (while moving) to each track. When you’re ready, begin the track from the beginning and chant along with the audio

https://sbeally.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/duple-series-3-neutral-no-echo-repeat.m4a
Neutral Syllables
https://sbeally.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/duple-series-3-rl-no-echo-repeat.m4a
Rhythm Language

Neutral Syllableshttps://sbeally.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/duple-series-3-rl-no-echo-repeat.m4a

What this looks like in 4/4 (common time)

link to printable pdf

What this looks like in 2/2 (cut time)

link to printable pdf

(note the audio links above does not mark both downbeats)

Series Four
Duple vs Triple subdivisions

AUDIO COMING SOON:
Neutral syllables
Words (“piz-za” for duple subdivisions, “straw-ber-ry” for triplets)
Rhythm language

What this looks like in 4/4 (common time)
What this looks like in 2/2 (cut time)

TRIPLE RHYTHMS

When you hear the tick, move your full body (or upper body if you are seated) to the macrobeat, and tap your hands in your lap to the microbeat. Keep this movement going while you echo the patterns.

Audio and visual coming soon

Neutral syllables
Rhythm language
What this looks like

Audio and visual coming soon

Neutral syllables
Rhythm language
What this looks like in 6/8 and 3/4

I can do all this … What next?

Ready for a challenge? Quizlet coming soon!

In the meantime, try creating your own 2- or 4-macrobeat rhythm from the building blocks above. Write it down, pick a scale, turn on a backing track (like these) and explore on your instrument. Repeated rhythmic patterns is a common way to create memorable melodies!

polyrhythms

YouTube educator and musician Saher Galt has made excellent videos on polyrhythms. Rather than reinvent the wheel, check out a couple of my favorites below (links to YouTube, and leaves this website):

Here are a few more YouTube videos for polyrhythm practice:

  • Hot Cup of Tea — Great for aural practice switching between feeling the beats in 2 and in 3! This piece of music combines triple with duple meter. Lots of 2 against 3 polyrhythm here.
  • Polyrhythms: 2 against 3 and 3 against 2 — with a circular visual aid. This video is designed for 3 in the left hand and 2 in the right hand.
  • 3:2 Polyrhythm Metronome — with a drumstick visual aid. This video is also designed for 3 in the left hand and 2 in the right hand.

And just for fun, check YouTube musicians and educators Shawn Crowder and Adam Neely show off some serious musical chops, as only the best drummers can:

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